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Cynthia:

We are celebrating mothers because it’s Mother’s Day. Think back, the very first mother was Eve. She was the mother of all living. How awesome to be able to give birth to the next generation. In our country right now, motherhood is not popular. You must do something else to validate yourself.

 

Doctor Sharon Elliot is my guest. She’s going to share a little bit about her mother.

Sharon:

Yeah. I couldn’t wait to talk about my mom. My mom met my dad when they were still in college. They weren’t in college together. He crashed her 21st birthday party with a friend. They were married 50 years before my dad passed. Several things I remember most about my mom. First, she was always into creative things. She was an elementary school teacher, so she would have papers she was grading or whatever she was doing for her kids on the dining room table.

Sharon:

When she came home from work, she cleaned off the dining room table and cooked dinner. We had dinner together every night as a family. Every night. As the youngest, she gave me the job of setting the table. I had to set a full table every night. We didn’t eat out of pots and pans. I had to take the food, put it in serving dishes, and put it on the table.

So, she always kept the family going with dinners at the table. Another thing, she taught me how to love my husband.

Sharon:

She loved my daddy, and she was there for what he wanted. The funny thing was, my mom said before she got married, she would never marry a teacher, a police officer, or a preacher. And she did it. When she married my dad, he wasn’t any of those things. He was working for the aircraft industry. They lived back in Maryland. Well, he went back to school and got his master’s. Then he started teaching.

Cynthia:

Oh, no.

Sharon:

Then when they moved to California, he got a job as a probation officer, and then he was called into the ministry. Oh, my goodness.

Cynthia:

She ended up with all three.

Sharon:

She ended up with all three. But he was the one man she loved. She hung in there and did what she needed to do as the wife of the man she married. I love that about her. Every Easter,  we had matching clothes because we made them. Mom taught us how to sew, and I sewed many of my clothes, like my prom dress. I also redesigned my wedding gown from her dress, and many other things.

Sharon:

We knew we were going to make our Easter outfits. But every year we were up almost all night, the night before Easter Sunday, finishing these outfits. We never looked ahead and got that done.

I just really appreciated my mom hanging in there with everything we did. She and my dad were at everything. Even after we got out of high school, they would come to events.

Sharon:

Not just graduations from college, but anything if we were speaking at a church or singing in a choir somewhere. Mom and Dad were both 5ft tall. That was it. So here come these two toddling along to our events. They made a wonderful home for us. My mom had a sign in the house that said, “My house is clean enough to be healthy, dirty enough to be happy.”

Cynthia:

That’s nice. I like that.

Sharon:

We weren’t tied to the house. The house was pretty much a home base. My dad was involved in everything, of course. Once he was senior pastor of our church, and then she was still involved in all these kinds of groups. I’m pretty sure that I get my organization from both of them, but I know definitely from my mom. She was involved in all kinds of things, but we were never neglected. Never did anything come before us as kids. So, I learned how to be a good wife from my mom. I learned how to multitask, which wasn’t even a word then when mom was doing it.

Sharon:

I learned how to sew from my mom. When she was ill, she put a note on the desk beside her bed. We were to open that either on her hundredth birthday or when she passed. So the day, the morning that she passed, she was living with my sister at the time. And we went, my niece was caring for her that evening. And my shift was coming later that day, but she passed that early morning.

Sharon:

My niece called me. I went over there. When my brother and sister arrived, she was still asleep in bed. We went into the room and opened the letter. The first thing the letter said was, “If you’re opening this without me, you know what’s up.”

Yeah.  She had everything listed.

Sharon:

Okay. I’m a member of the Women in White group, and this lady is over it. They’re going to want to write a proclamation. So, here’s her number. Call her. And I’m a member of this. She had this all listed. She told us what dress we were to put on her. And at the end, she said, “Make sure they put a smile on my face.”

Cynthia:

Hmm.

Sharon:

That was in 2001. We have been able to have a smile on our faces and do what Mom said.

Cynthia:

Wow. She sounds like a wonderful woman.

Sharon:

Nancy Brown Jennings Norris.

Cynthia:

That’s so neat. And you have become just like her. You’re just an amazing person.

Sharon:

Thank you. Thank you. Thank you for allowing me to share about my mom.

Cynthia:

Thank you

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