Surprising Facts about What Colonists Drank

Surprising Facts about What Colonists Drank

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Stay Hydrated

The weather outside is very, very hot and we need to drink more to make sure that we stay
hydrated.

They Drank Water?

Have you ever given any thought to what colonists drank. Well, the water in the cities was not safe to drink because people poured their sewer
into the river and the lakes.

If you were in the countryside, it was a little better as long as you put your outhouse in the right
place. And as long as your neighbor put their outhouse in the right place.

They Drank Milk?

Milk was not safe to drink either. They had no refrigeration. And if you drank it, you could very well get a disease.
Abraham Lincoln’s mother died of a disease that she got from drinking milk.

Colonists drank alcohol, rum, whiskey, beer, and particularly hard cider. They gave it to
their children because they had nothing else that was really safe.

What about Tea?

Late in the colonial period, they began to drink coffee and tea. They didn’t know why it was safe. They didn’t know why it
was healthy because they had no idea what germs were and that boiling killed the germs.

But they were thrilled to have something different to drink that wasn’t alcohol. Now, imagine their
frustration when they started getting taxes on tea. When you put it in that context, I can
understand.

Living in Difficult Times

They lived in very difficult times. You know, we also live in very difficult times.
Have you ever noticed that you feel like you’re eating or drinking something that’s very safe,
only to discover an article somewhere or something on the internet that says, that’s going to kill
you?

Ancient Wisdom

How can we live in a crazy upside down world? Everything is skewed. Everything is messed up.
I have some ancient wisdom for you. This is from the book of John.

“Whoever drinks of the water that I shall give him shall never thirst, but the water that I shall give him shall become in
him a well of water springing up to each one of life.”

“And again, Jesus said, if any man is thirsty, let him come to me and drink. He who believes in
me, as the scripture said, from his inmost being shall flow rivers of living water.”

Living Water

Wow, living water. That means wisdom for today, grace for today, and for tomorrow, eternity. Eternal life.
Yeah, I prefer living water while living in a crazy upside down world.

Hosting with a Heart

Hosting with a Heart

 

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Cynthia:

Hospitality can have an incredible impact on people. You can bond with people, create intense friends, and sharpen your relationship with the Lord as you spend time with other godly people.

The Story of Katrina von Bora:

A good example of this is Katrina van Bora. She was, of course, Katie Luther.

She married Martin Luther in 1525. The duke gave them the Black Cloister, the monastery where the monks used to live. And because they had no income, she started a boarding house. Students at Wittenberg University needed a place to stay.

 

Cynthia:

They all wanted to talk to Luther. After dinner, they would sit around and ask him questions. , He would answer at length, and the kids wrote it down. That became table talk. That’s where it came from.

He had an incredible impact on these students because provided a home.

Dr. Mel Tavares:

 

Can you tell me some things that you have done with hospitality?

Dr. Mel Tavares:

Sure. Thank you for that back information, the backstory on Martin Luther, and Table Talk. That is central to everything I do hospitality-wise. The table is ever so important.  Everybody gathers at the table.

Now, I have it in the dining room, but we are always around the table. And so that is pretty important.

Three Categories of Visitors

There are three categories of hospitality: friends and family, the neighbors, and the ones that drop in.

The second group is the ones who I would say primarily are from a church. They come because of I host a meeting of some kin

The third one is a special occasion: baby shower, bridal shower,  or graduation. It could be in my family or a friend.

It is always around coffee or tea, dessert or meals. When we have a meal, there’s lots of storytelling and laughter.

Dr. Mel Tavares:

Of course, a Bible study gets a lot more in-depth. In all those cases, though, we’re connecting. And I just love that. Years and years, decades later, some of those friendships have still been forged. They haven’t dissipated. Even though I’ve moved 300 miles away, I’m still friends with these people. So it’s pretty amazing.

Cynthia:

Yeah. There is something about being around a table with people as you share a meal or something to drink that you bond like you don’t any other time. We need that despite social media Can you tell me how you can get people away from their phones these days?

Technology Interruptions

Dr. Mel Tavares:

Lead by example, so we don’t bring our phones to the table. Now, even in a world of younger generations, everything is about their phone. So my children’s generation, the millennials, that’s been a part of their very fiber.

If the conversation is engaging enough, then I don’t feel they will spend the time on the phone unless we’re recording each other, taking pictures, doing snap filters, whatever. But if conversation is real, and I will say heartfelt.

Heart to Heart Conversations

People need that so desperately. You can’t get that from the phone. When that heart-to-heart is taking place over a cup of coffee or tea or a meal, people leave their phones alone. Engage them on a heart level, the phone takes second place.

Cynthia:

How do you get them to really unburden themselves?

Dr. Mel Tavares:

We make them feel very welcome. Make a point of going out to the door, welcoming the person, calling them by name, hugging them if they’re a hugger, and immediately asking something about their lives.

Don’t discuss the weather. Ask about deeper issues. You know, how’s your husband recovering? I’m so sorry to hear about your mom and whatever it is and to be able to connect immediately. If they’re coming to our home, we should know something about them that will allow us to connect on a heart level.

“I’m going to fix your coffee, keep talking. I want to hear how things are going.” That will open them up.

Cynthia:

So you’re simply saying that you provide a listening ear and you show true interest and they open up.

Dr. Mel Tavares:

True. That is exactly how I do it. Yep.

Cynthia:

It sounds like people are hungry for that.

Our Lonely and Transient World:

Dr. Mel Tavares:

People are hungry. This is a lonely world. You alluded to that a minute ago, talking about, you know, social media, but it’s so obvious that we are more disconnected than ever.

We can live in a neighborhood with people now and not even know their names. That is not the way it used to be. We always had neighbors in and out of the house. It’s a very transient world.

So even if we stay put, neighbors move and the house is sold and somebody else is in, and we have to be very intentional to connect with people because they are seeking a connection with someone.

Cynthia:

Are you saying that you’re intentional then when a new neighbor moves in that you take them something?

Dr. Mel Tavares:

My current neighborhood is a little more challenging because we live in an urban area with many apartment buildings around us.

The houses on my immediate left or right, I can take them something. I’ll send a text to them. I try to get their phone numbers immediately and say, hey, I want you to know I’m here.

If you ever have an emergency, whether it’s, you know, you’ve got a run, something’s happened, and you need to have your kid watched or you need, you know, your dog or whatever it is going on, please know I’m here. We’re here.

Dr. Mel Tavares:

We’re neighbors. We’re here to help each other. And that is also something they don’t hear very often anymore.

Dr. Mel Tavares:

So by doing that and saying, here’s my phone number, would you mind giving me yours? It immediately bonds us. And then I make a point. If I see them outside, I make sure I step out and I talk to them, that sort of thing.

Reactions to Our Faith:

Cynthia:

Do you find people at all intimidated by your faith?

Dr. Mel Tavares:

I don’t think they’re intimidated. Not everyone’s going to embrace that for themselves. There’s some sense of stability when they talk to me. They know I am who I am, and it is my faith that holds me solid.

I think inviting someone to our home and allows them to feel the peace. God is here, he’s present. It’s a home where his spirit resides. And so they step into the house, they feel something different immediately.

Dr. Mel Tavares:

For new believers, we have the opportunity again. They don’t necessarily have that calm peace, the abiding that we experience. Bringing them to our home allows us to role model that for them.

Finding Peace

Cynthia:

Are you finding that even believers then have their unsure themselves, perhaps fearful, uneasy, even though they’re believers?

Dr. Mel Tavares:

Absolutely. We are in a post pandemic world. People expected I expected that at some point we would return to normal, but rather than return to normal, everything has compounded and gotten worse.

Believers who are not as well connected to the Lord on a daily basis, may not have that peace

Dr. Mel Tavares:

It’s an opportunity for us to pull in moms, especially moms with children that are struggling and juggling everything. They still have some fears and some concerns, what’s going to happen?

We have the opportunity to pour into believers and to give them hope. Our homes give a perfect setting to be able to say,  “It might be a little bit crazy out there. But here it’s calm, it’s peaceful, it’s joyful. It’s a safe place. It’s a place where we laugh and we share and we have memories and we connect.”

Dr. Mel Tavares:

And even if they have to go back to a chaotic life for that little bit of time, they’re home safe with us, and it’s a good thing.

I would say that, you know, it just came to my mind. I minister to many women who are in domestic situations or difficult marriages, things that make their home life very difficult.

Maybe their job is also difficult. And they’ve got a lot on their shoulders. And so particularly when they come in and they can just have, even if it’s just an hour and a cup of coffee, just to breathe.

Hospitality Tips:

Cynthia:

What kind of tips would you give to someone who is just beginning who would like to sort of be hospitable in the future?

Dr. Mel Tavares:

There are some very practical things that I’ve done.

One, I have a cabinet that, a dish cabinet that I put some certain things in: serving trays, dessert plates, coffee cups, the spoons and forks. I like to have a stack of those that kind of go with the season.

Right now it’s all floral kinds of stuff. And just have the cabinet stocked.  I have a few things in my pantry that are ready to go: a variety of teas, a variety of coffees, creamers, crackers or some packaged cookies.

Dr. Mel Tavares:

I have a bin in my pantry that is for snacks and drinks for children, because if they bring along kids, there’s just certain things like almost every kid will eat goldfish. For example, the goldfish crackers. So having the crackers, having some capri suns or something.

And I like to either have cookies in the freezer or home baked. I like to bake them ahead and have them ready.

Dr. Mel Tavares:

They thaw very, very quickly. You can pop them in the microwave and defrost them. If you were to come to my house, I can immediately be thinking and going to the freezer, grab the stuff, put it in the microwave, get it thawed out while I’m getting the coffee or tea or whatever’s happening.

Then keep on hand a few drinks that can be iced, whether that’s tea or soda pop or seltzer water or regular water.

Your Housekeeping:

Dr. Mel Tavares:

People don’t worry about your house. When I get up in the morning, I make sure everything is decluttered, then I wipe down the bathroom.

 

Dr. Mel Tavares:

And then don’t worry about it. I’m there to have a heart to heart. I want to connect. So nine times out of ten, people hang out around the table. I want the rest of it kind of to stay in a decluttered mode so that if somebody is coming over, it’s not as stressful to me.

I’m much more likely if somebody calls and they’re having a hard day to say, “You know, the house is empty right now. Come on over, let’s have a cup of tea and talk.”

Cynthia:

I love that.

Dr. Mel Tavares:

Yeah.

Cynthia:

I need to work on the declutter thing because I start little projects and I leave the little projects and piles here and piles there.

You have got some great suggestions in terms of keeping stuff on hand to pop them right out. Can you give me just a little summary of anything else you think you might want to say to someone who is thinking about hospitality?

Dr. Mel Tavares:

I would say that some people have a gift of hospitality, an actual gift. I know a person who’s very gifted. It just comes easy. I’m not that person. It doesn’t come easy. But we are all called by the Lord to be hospitable and to encourage one another.

Cynthia:

And that is wonderful. Thank you for your time.

 

Cool Communication Strategies: Engaging with Fans

Cool Communication Strategies: Engaging with Fans

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Summer has arrived, and we’ll be using our fans to stay cool outside.

Engaging with Fans:

Did you know that wealthy women communicated with their fans?
Close your fan and touch your right cheek to say yes. No is touching the left cheek. Of course
that might create confusion. The man watching has to know left from right.
Hold your fan over your face if you want to get to know someone.
And if you want to be rid of someone, place your fan on the left ear.

Cool Communication:

This summer, as you use your fans, I want you to keep your cool.
Let no unwholesome word proceed from your mouth, but only such a word as is good for
edification according to the need of the moment, that it may give grace to those who hear. (Eph.
4:29 NAS)

Engage with fans and enjoy ‘cool’ communication by showing grace.

Echoing Footsteps: A Soldier Lost

Echoing Footsteps: A Soldier Lost

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On Memorial Day, we remember those who lost their lives defending our country. And today I want to remember Army Nurse Captain Jennifer Moreno.

Her Life:

She was remembered for her beautiful smile.  She was in Afghanistan and was deployed with a special ops team. They encountered a suicide bomber.  One of the men was hurt. When he fell to the ground crying, she rushed to his aid, imperiling her own life.

She stepped on a landmine and was killed.  Jennifer is an excellent example of selfless service to others.

Let me read to you.  “With humility of mind, let each of you regard one another as more important than himself. Do not merely look out for your own personal interest, but also for the interest of others.” Philippians 2

Remember:

Today we remember Captain Jennifer Moreno.

 

The Pancake Connection: Mixing Faith and Food

The Pancake Connection: Mixing Faith and Food

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Cynthia:

Today we’re going to talk about a grandmother who had an incredible impact on someone’s life.  I have with me Carol Lethem, who is also an author. She reaches out to caregivers. Welcome, Carol.

Carole:

Thank you, Cynthia. I’m so happy to be here. I’m excited to tell you about my grandmother.

Cynthia:

Your grandmother was more of a mother to you than your mother, right?

Carole:

Yes, I had a very chaotic, crazy childhood. It’s like my life, my whole life has been chaotic.

Cynthia:

I know you well enough to believe that.

Carole:

I had a very chaotic, crazy childhood. Childhood. My grandmother, Lily, was the one constant.

Carole:

We didn’t live by her until I was in my early teens. But when I was a child, she was just this constant. And we would see her two or three times a year. And it was my favorite thing. Each one of us got to go and spend a week with her by ourselves. I cherished those memories so much. I could get away from the craziness and just be loved on.

Cynthia:

What did you learn from your grandmother?

Carole:

My grandmother gave me the love of two things.  One is the love for talking to Jesus and prayer. And she’s the first person I ever, ever, ever saw have a daily relationship with God, where she would sit and read his word.

Carole:

She would pray out loud and had a list of things she would pray for every day. The second thing she gave me a love for was pancakes. To this day, I cannot eat a pancake without thinking about my grandmother. Oddly enough that came from the same original experience. The love for talking to Jesus and the love for pancakes came from the same day.

Carole:

I was about five or six years old. I was spending my time with my grandmother, and I remember waking up one morning and coming down the stairs. As I came around the corner, there was a big, gigantic dining room table. My little tiny grandmother was sitting at the end of the dining room table with her cup of coffee, her Bible, and a notepad.

Carole:

And she had her head bowed. I waddled up. Five years. Six years old. I can’t remember exactly. But I can remember, her eyes were closed. I touched her arm and I said, “Grandma, Grandma, what are you doing?”

Carole:

She pulled me up onto her lap and said, “Okay, hush, hush, baby for a minute. I’m talking to God.”

Carole:

I just sat there in awe for a second as I listened to her go through her list with her eyes closed. I kept waiting for God to speak back because she said she was talking to God. When we got done, I said, “Do you do this every day?”

Carole:

She said, “Yes, I do.”

I said, “Does he ever talk back to you?”

She said, “I’ve never actually heard his voice. But he tells me on the inside.  I hear him on the inside. Someday you will too.  I’m done talking to Jesus this morning. I think it’s a pancake kind of morning, so let’s go into the kitchen and make pancakes.

Carole:

I remember we went into the kitchen and got out all the stuff. She let me stand on the stool next to her with my apron. We made pancakes. To this day, I associate talking to God and pancakes. Many times after I get done reading my scripture, I want a pancake.

Cynthia:

Kids will associate things our love with the things that we cook. That’s a really sweet story.

Carole:

Yeah. Yeah. And, and I remember watching her over the next few years. I would always sneak downstairs because I wanted to see if she was praying.  And she was.

Cynthia:

Yeah. Sweet. What advice would you give to someone with this Mother’s Day coming up?

Carole:

As a grandmother, I would say, cherish those moments when you spend time with them. Understand that they’re growing and I’m not their parent.  That’s a hard one. Sometimes I want to be their parent, but I’m not. And then staying in touch and finding out what stage they’re at.

Give them the gift of time. Uninterrupted time. Turn the phone off. Be present in the moment and try to figure out what’s going on in their lives.  Ask questions.

Cynthia:

It’s good.  Thank you, Carol. You’re such a blessing and I’m so thankful you’re with us today.

Carole:

Thank you so much. Now I think I’m going to go have some pancakes.

Celebrating Mothers: Dr. Elliott Paid Tribute to Her Mother

Celebrating Mothers: Dr. Elliott Paid Tribute to Her Mother

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Cynthia:

We are celebrating mothers because it’s Mother’s Day. Think back, the very first mother was Eve. She was the mother of all living. How awesome to be able to give birth to the next generation. In our country right now, motherhood is not popular. You must do something else to validate yourself.

 

Doctor Sharon Elliot is my guest. She’s going to share a little bit about her mother.

Sharon:

Yeah. I couldn’t wait to talk about my mom. My mom met my dad when they were still in college. They weren’t in college together. He crashed her 21st birthday party with a friend. They were married 50 years before my dad passed. Several things I remember most about my mom. First, she was always into creative things. She was an elementary school teacher, so she would have papers she was grading or whatever she was doing for her kids on the dining room table.

Sharon:

When she came home from work, she cleaned off the dining room table and cooked dinner. We had dinner together every night as a family. Every night. As the youngest, she gave me the job of setting the table. I had to set a full table every night. We didn’t eat out of pots and pans. I had to take the food, put it in serving dishes, and put it on the table.

So, she always kept the family going with dinners at the table. Another thing, she taught me how to love my husband.

Sharon:

She loved my daddy, and she was there for what he wanted. The funny thing was, my mom said before she got married, she would never marry a teacher, a police officer, or a preacher. And she did it. When she married my dad, he wasn’t any of those things. He was working for the aircraft industry. They lived back in Maryland. Well, he went back to school and got his master’s. Then he started teaching.

Cynthia:

Oh, no.

Sharon:

Then when they moved to California, he got a job as a probation officer, and then he was called into the ministry. Oh, my goodness.

Cynthia:

She ended up with all three.

Sharon:

She ended up with all three. But he was the one man she loved. She hung in there and did what she needed to do as the wife of the man she married. I love that about her. Every Easter,  we had matching clothes because we made them. Mom taught us how to sew, and I sewed many of my clothes, like my prom dress. I also redesigned my wedding gown from her dress, and many other things.

Sharon:

We knew we were going to make our Easter outfits. But every year we were up almost all night, the night before Easter Sunday, finishing these outfits. We never looked ahead and got that done.

I just really appreciated my mom hanging in there with everything we did. She and my dad were at everything. Even after we got out of high school, they would come to events.

Sharon:

Not just graduations from college, but anything if we were speaking at a church or singing in a choir somewhere. Mom and Dad were both 5ft tall. That was it. So here come these two toddling along to our events. They made a wonderful home for us. My mom had a sign in the house that said, “My house is clean enough to be healthy, dirty enough to be happy.”

Cynthia:

That’s nice. I like that.

Sharon:

We weren’t tied to the house. The house was pretty much a home base. My dad was involved in everything, of course. Once he was senior pastor of our church, and then she was still involved in all these kinds of groups. I’m pretty sure that I get my organization from both of them, but I know definitely from my mom. She was involved in all kinds of things, but we were never neglected. Never did anything come before us as kids. So, I learned how to be a good wife from my mom. I learned how to multitask, which wasn’t even a word then when mom was doing it.

Sharon:

I learned how to sew from my mom. When she was ill, she put a note on the desk beside her bed. We were to open that either on her hundredth birthday or when she passed. So the day, the morning that she passed, she was living with my sister at the time. And we went, my niece was caring for her that evening. And my shift was coming later that day, but she passed that early morning.

Sharon:

My niece called me. I went over there. When my brother and sister arrived, she was still asleep in bed. We went into the room and opened the letter. The first thing the letter said was, “If you’re opening this without me, you know what’s up.”

Yeah.  She had everything listed.

Sharon:

Okay. I’m a member of the Women in White group, and this lady is over it. They’re going to want to write a proclamation. So, here’s her number. Call her. And I’m a member of this. She had this all listed. She told us what dress we were to put on her. And at the end, she said, “Make sure they put a smile on my face.”

Cynthia:

Hmm.

Sharon:

That was in 2001. We have been able to have a smile on our faces and do what Mom said.

Cynthia:

Wow. She sounds like a wonderful woman.

Sharon:

Nancy Brown Jennings Norris.

Cynthia:

That’s so neat. And you have become just like her. You’re just an amazing person.

Sharon:

Thank you. Thank you. Thank you for allowing me to share about my mom.

Cynthia:

Thank you

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