Grandparenting: Be Phenomenal

Grandparenting: Be Phenomenal

Grandparenting: Be Phenomenal:

How can you be a phenomenal grandparent? A few months ago, I became a grandparent for the very first time. First, I saw my daughter in labor. What an experience. That wasn’t my favorite part of motherhood. Second, I gazed at this beautiful baby girl who is now part of my family, and I found it hard to express the emotions that washed over me. I recalled my own grandmother and my mother. Plus I thought of the day I had my first child.

I love that precious little girl with every cell in my body, but in many ways being a grandmother is different. Grandmothers aren’t mothers. We aren’t in the driver’s seat. Instead, we sit in the back seat. We don’t name the baby, nor do we make decisions about how the baby is raised.  While we still want the best for that child, we play a secondary role in the child’s life.

So how can you be a good grandmother? I think about the passage the Apostle Paul wrote to Timothy, “I am reminded of your sincere faith, a faith that dwelt first in your grandmother Lois and your mother Eunice and now, I am sure, dwells in you as well.”

God does work in families. He is, after all, the originator of the family. He does want us to impact the next generation. I love the words of Dr. Mary Manz Simon, “We are life veterans. We bring wisdom, experience, and a clear sense of what’s important.”

Dr. Mary Manz Simon is my guest today and she has just written Faith Footprints with my Grandchild.

2:05 Why did you write this book?

3:10 As a grandmother, what have I left behind?

3:30 Is there a meaning behind the book title?

4:45 What are some worries grandmothers have?

5:45 The word grandmother sounds old-fashioned. How can we get past that?

6:55 How can you build a relationship with your grandchild?

[tweetthis]Leave a legacy with your grandchild[/tweetthis]

 

Dr. Mary Simon

Dr. Mary Simon with Cynthia

 

When Anything Goes

When Anything Goes

When Anything Goes

When I was a little girl, I played with several chums in my neighborhood. If one of us did something inappropriate, the mothers talked and meted out punishment. In school, I recall hearing the Bible read. Everyone understood they should work hard in school and treat others with kindness. We shared a consensus on right and wrong.

Our country changed.

I saw billboards that said, “God is Dead.”

I recall a political campaign a number of years ago. The press kept saying character doesn’t matter.

Then there was: What is the meaning of the word ‘is’?

The new atheists today ridicule Christians. Believing in God is equivalent to believing in the Easter bunny.

I’m saddened when I see Christians portrayed with disdain and disgust on movies and the media.

Freedom of speech is not subject to Political correctness.

The Bible says, “Be ready to give an answer to anyone who asked the reason for the hope within you.”

Leslie Williams is my guest. She’s going to talk about living with wisdom and savvy in a crazy world anything goes. When Anything Goes is the name of her newest book.

1:55 What is post-Christian?

3:30 The difference between those who wear the label ‘Christian’ and those who are.

5:00 What is faith?

6:25 What is the god of the gaps?

9:05 How can we live as a Christian, and why is that still a good choice?

13:20 Are we addicted to meaning? What do you mean by that statement?

[tweetthis]Faith in Jesus isn’t a leap in the dark[/tweetthis]

Learn more about Leslie’s book here.

anything-goes

Leslie Williams

Leslie Williams

Remaining Sane When Life Erupts

Remaining Sane When Life Erupts

Remaining Sane When Life Erupts

I can recall when I was a child in class. We were getting ready to study the human body, and I was so excited to learn what my internal organs did. I had some strange idea that my organs did wonderful things for the world. How disappointing to discover they merely kept me alive. Of course, in adolescence, the question of identity rose.Those questions are important to ask because it’s difficult to live without meaning.On the other hand, it’s very easy to build our self-worth around what we do.

When I finished school, I became a nurse, but I gave up that career to raise five children. That made me really sad, but I’ve been giving up my whole life in some ways. Later I found myself as a young mother who nursed her babies, but that didn’t last either. I grieved that role when I weaned my youngest child. Then I saw myself as a homeschool mother. That job lasted longer, but that distinction disappeared also. Each time my job description changed, I felt pain and had to adjust. I had to rethink life as a child of God. Someone Jesus loved and died for, but that transition can be tough.

Sometimes life really falls apart. How can we pull the shreds of life back together? How can we get through those times of disappointment when we wonder who we are?

Cynthia Rutchti is my guest. She has written Song of Silence. In this novel, the main character loses her gifting and finds herself afloat.

4:30 The main character, Lucy, was giving to others from her gift of music. How can we find that sweet spot so we can bless those around us?

6:30 Lucy was based on a real person who ministered through music.

8:40 Music contains rests, and Lucy taught her students to ‘play the rests.’ How can we do that by using those hard times in life?

10:10 What if we resist that reset time?

11:20 What does a healthy identity look like? How can Christians get there?

13:50 How can we achieve a healthy marriage in later years like Lucy and her husband?

16:25 Lucy’s family did things to comfort her she didn’t like. How can we avoid facing that in a crisis?

19:00 Lucy’s doctor sent her to a club. What was that great idea about?

20:00 Explain the role of arts in education

23:20 What is the main message of the book?

Learn more about Cynthia Ruchti here.

[tweetthis]Hold onto Hope even when our song is silenced[/tweetthis]

[tweetthis]God will restore our song in ways we don’t expect.[/tweetthis]

Fight with your Spouse and Grow Together

Fight with your Spouse and Grow Together

Fight with your Spouse and Grow Together

Someone actually advocates fighting? Wow. You’ll love their answers.

“The wisdom from above is first pure, then peaceable.” James 3:17

When you got married, you probably had stars in your eyes and romance in your heart. Many of us didn’t think much about the happily ever after part, but I grew up thinking peaceable meant hardly any conflict. Here’s a story about that.

We’ve all heard of the Victorian Age, and you probably have bad feelings about that time period. Well, Queen Victoria and her husband Albert were believers. That might surprise you, but they deliberately chose to set an example for the nation.

Victoria grew up in a home without a father. Her English father died when she was an infant, and her mother wasn’t particularly wise about getting along with people. Because her mother hoped to be regent when her daughter ascended the throne.

Victoria thought that no conflict was the goal in marriage. And she was queen. So when she married the man she loved, Prince Albert, she was in charge. And she gave him nothing to do. Plus the British constitution had no role for the prince consort. Well, it wasn’t long before Albert was quite frustrated.

The good news is that Albert was a strong believer, and he set a goal of ministering to his wife/family and the people of Britain. Their beginning was rocky. Victoria would get upset and scream. She was famed for her temper, but he was gentle and firm.

Not authentic, but it represents what actually went on. There’s a story told about Albert locking himself into a room. When she knocked he would ask who is there. If she said the queen. He wouldn’t allow her in. After a couple of years, he was able to convince her he had a better way. And together they built an incredible marriage which was the envy of Europe.

My guests today are Ron and Deb DeArmond. They wrote the book, Don’t Go to Bed Angry.

3:04 What gave rise to the book?

3:42 Leaving your baggage

4:35 Arguments in the DeArmond house

5:10 Their parameters

5:40 How to set parameters

6:40 Recovery from a heated discussion

8:20 Listening actively

9:00 Knowing how you process information is key

12:00 How to ‘table’ an intense discussion

[tweetthis]Fight fair: Solve the problem rather than kill the person[/tweetthis]

[tweetthis]A martial spat is normal. Failing to solve the issue is pathological[/tweetthis]

Crisis Preparedness

Crisis Preparedness

Crisis Preparedness: Don’t panic

I don’t know if you’ve ever had a time when you felt panicked, but I have. My youngest son is disabled. With numerous overlapping issues, he’s severe. I was homeschooling him, and I saw intelligence despite his barriers. A series of events led us to seek complete testing. The idea of testing bothered me because I worried how well he could perform  with the number of problems he had. In  time found a neuro-psychiatrist who came highly recommended. The doctor administered test over a few days.

At last came our final appointment. My husband and I would meet with the doctor for test results and a final diagnosis. That was the scariest day.  The diagnosis he received would impact him for the rest of his life.I can recall my heart pounding and my chest tightening at the thought of driving to the office.  I survived by praising God. All day I sought the Lord. I praised him for the air conditioning in the car, the blue sky, the car, the fluffy clouds, the dress I had on, my favorite color. Those prayers kept me calm enough to hear what the doctor had to say.

Think about the words Paul wrote in Philippians four: “Be anxious for nothing, but in everything by prayer and thanksgiving make your request known to God and the peace that passes all understanding will guard your heart and mind in Christ Jesus.” Those words are easy to say. Doing it can be much harder.

Today I have Maureen Pratt. She’s written a book called, Don’t Panic, which teaches how to prepare for a crisis.

3:00 The story behind the book

5:00 Living through tornado

9:45 How do you react in a crisis

11:45 If you are hyper focuses

12:20 Deep Breathing

18:00 Spiritual preparation for a crisis

19:20 The role of friends

21:20 Crisis preparedness kit

26:00 How can a crisis be a good thing?

Don't panic

Maureen Pratt

Learn more about Maureen here.

 

Tweetables:

[tweetthis]Prepare for a crisis[/tweetthis]

[tweetthis]Learn how you react to a crisis[/tweetthis]

Love Your Muslim Neighbor

Love Your Muslim Neighbor

Love Your Muslim Neighbor – Wow! How can we do that?

Many today are wary of Muslims.I don’t know about you, but  I feel a little uncomfortable around them. You can  justify being uneasy  based on the many attacks around the world. Recently we received evidence an Islamic terrorist carried out the shooting in Orlando and the terrorist attack in Nice, France. In fact, many of us have been uncomfortable since 9/11 when terrorist attacked the twin towers. Add to that the horrors of Isis. We keep seeing heart-rending videos of them slaughtering those Christians and burning anyone who disagrees. Fear doesn’t seem unreasonable, and I too struggle with being afraid.

But God calls us not to fear: Matthew 10:28  “And do not fear those who kill the body but cannot kill the soul. Rather fear him who can destroy both soul and body in hell.” Those words might be easy to say and hard to do, but we must remember believers have eternal life. We are blessed with riches beyond what we can imagine, and we are called to love those for whom Christ died.  Luke 6:27 “But I (Jesus) say to you who hear, Love your enemies, do good to those who hate you.”

Last fall I heard Nabeel Qureshi speak about his Muslim upbringing, and I read his book, Seeking Allah, Finding Jesus. His story  revolutionized my view of Muslims. Most of them are nonviolent and hate what they see in the news. I found myself softening toward them and wanting to reach out. How can we make friends with them?

Today I have Ken Philpot with me. He’s a pastor in California, and he has reached out to Muslims in his area. He’s written a book called If Allah Wills. 1:10 What happens if you ask to visit their mosque?

1:10 What happens if you ask to visit their mosque?

1:10 What happens if you ask to visit their mosque?

1:30 Different kinds of Muslims

2:20 Go to Friday Prayers, and open time

3:10 Muslim attitude toward women

4:20 Could a lady visit a Muslim Mosque?

5:20 The Muslim handshake

5:50 A couple reaching out to Muslims

7:35 Cultures who have guilt, versus honor

8:45 Shame on the family in the Muslim culture

9:40 Muslim family vs the clan

10:10 What we can learn from them

11:00 Muslim religion is outward

12:15 Muslim fears

12:40 Two ways Muslims go to heaven

13:20 Contrast Christianity

14:15 Second Muslim fear

15:30 The Apostate

16:30 Dominate motivator

Love Your Muslim Neighbor

Ken Philpot

Tweetables:

[tweetthis]Love Your Muslim Neighbor[/tweetthis]

[tweetthis]Make a Muslim friend and show them God’s love[/tweetthis]

 

 

You can find Pastor Philpot’s book  here.

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